Ny times photo essays

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Since , the General Pencil Company has been converting huge quantities of raw materials wax, paint, cedar planks, graphite into products you can find, neatly boxed and labeled, in art and office-supply stores across the nation: watercolor pencils, editing pencils, sticks of charcoal, pastel chalks. Heaps of pencil cores wait piled against a concrete wall, like an arsenal of gray spaghetti. A woodworking machine will cut the individual pencils into their desired shape — round, hexagonal or otherwise. Hansen followed a former paper factory employee as she had her hair shortened by a civilian hairdresser, presented her stocking seams to a male superior for inspection, and otherwise prepared to join the American war effort. Photographs like these do something similar. With shades drawn, the stillness of this sitting area now stands in contrast to the bustle and gleam outside. They preserve the secret origins of objects we tend to take for granted. Like a pencil, these photos trace motions that may someday be gone. Quiet Places B. They show us the pride and connection of the humans who make those objects, as well as a mode of manufacturing that is itself disappearing in favor of automation. CreditChristopher Payne Image Editing pencils are sharpened at each end: One makes red marks, the other blue. Payne conveys the incidental beauty of functional machines: strange architectures of chains, conveyor belts, glue pots, metal discs and gears thick with generations of grease. He captures the strangeness of seeing a tool as simple as a pencil disassembled into its even simpler component parts. CreditChristopher Payne Image Pastel extrusions, used for colored pencils, are laid by hand onto grooved wooden boards, where they will dry before being placed in pencil slats.

Other parts of the factory are eruptions of color. Wood shavings fly as fresh pencils are dragged across the sharpening machine, a wheel of fast-spinning sandpaper.

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Sign up for our newsletter to get the best of The New York Times Magazine delivered to your inbox every week. Payne conveys the incidental beauty of functional machines: strange architectures of chains, conveyor belts, glue pots, metal discs and gears thick with generations of grease.

CreditChristopher Payne Image These graphite cores were heated in an oven to remove moisture and harden the material.

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As he took in each space and created these subtle, multilayered photographs, Epstein was especially struck by the number of rooms that felt like places of freedom, with each figure creating his or her own unique interior world. CreditChristopher Payne Image After receiving a coating of paint, pencils are returned by conveyor for another layer. Photographs like these do something similar. A woodworking machine will cut the individual pencils into their desired shape — round, hexagonal or otherwise. Orange groves at dusk, sky full of pastel color, and Janet Reno is driving the car, a rental. They show us the pride and connection of the humans who make those objects, as well as a mode of manufacturing that is itself disappearing in favor of automation. He captures the strangeness of seeing a tool as simple as a pencil disassembled into its even simpler component parts. Wood shavings fly as fresh pencils are dragged across the sharpening machine, a wheel of fast-spinning sandpaper. The lines it makes can be fat or thin, screams or whispers, blocks of concrete or blades of grass, all depending on changes of pressure so subtle that we would hardly notice them in any other context. CreditChristopher Payne Image Pastel extrusions, used for colored pencils, are laid by hand onto grooved wooden boards, where they will dry before being placed in pencil slats. It was not unlike a museum in that regard. Payne conveys the incidental beauty of functional machines: strange architectures of chains, conveyor belts, glue pots, metal discs and gears thick with generations of grease.

And yet when you hold a pencil, your quietest little hand-dances are mapped exactly, from the loops and slashes to the final dot at the very end of a sentence.

Attorney General — lived here for the rest of her life.

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The trays seen here will be turned upside down and dunked in blue paint by a dipper machine, marking the blue half. His last feature was about the writer John McPhee. Image Extrusions of graphite are collected for recycling. The bed and other antiques once belonged to her maternal grandparents. He and his next wife, Karen B. CreditChristopher Payne Image Ferrules — the metal bands that cinch around the bases of erasers — are loaded onto a conveyor and sent to a tipping machine. Hundreds of pencils sit stacked in honeycomb towers. A woodworking machine will cut the individual pencils into their desired shape — round, hexagonal or otherwise.

Such radical simplicity is surprisingly complicated to produce.

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