Value of philosophy

Philosophy, though unable to tell us with certainty what is the true answer to the doubts which it raises, is able to suggest many possibilities which enlarge our thoughts and free them from the tyranny of custom.

the methods of philosophy

Philosophy is challenging not only because it tackles hard problems, but because it unrelenting in its demand for clarity. The private world of instinctive interests is a small one, set in the midst of a great and powerful world which must, sooner or later, lay our private world in ruins.

Unless we can so enlarge our interests as to include the whole outer world, we remain like a garrison in a beleagured fortress, knowing that the enemy prevents escape and that ultimate surrender is inevitable.

philosophy of life and social values

He concludes that, "through the greatness of the universe which philosophy contemplates, the mind also is rendered great. It is teaching me me how to frame problems and where to go to make better sense of those problems.

All too often philosophy is thought of as some daunting subject, inaccessible to the average man, and fit only for people with too much time on their hands or scholars.

Physical science, through the medium of inventions, is useful to innumerable people who are wholly ignorant of it; thus the study of physical science is to be recommended, not only, or primarily, because of the effect on the student, but rather because of the effect on mankind in general.

According to bertrand russell, what is the chief value of philosophy?

Therefore, you need to think more in order to live more. Training your body to bench press two hundred pounds makes opening the pickle jar quite a bit easier. But if you put the same question to a philosopher, he will, if he is candid, have to confess that his study has not achieved positive results such as have been achieved by other sciences. If all men were well off, if poverty and disease had been reduced to their lowest possible point, there would still remain much to be done to produce a valuable society; and even in the existing world the goods of the mind are at least as important as the goods of the body. Russell's belief is that everything that depends on the private world "distorts the object" of contemplation and prevents the union of the object and the intellect. On such a subject it would be unwise to pronounce dogmatically; but if the investigations of our previous chapters have not led us astray, we shall be compelled to renounce the hope of finding philosophical proofs of religious beliefs. But further, if we are not to fail in our endeavour to determine the value of philosophy, we must first free our minds from the prejudices of what are wrongly called 'practical' men. Philosophy, though unable to tell us with certainty what is the true answer to the doubts which it raises, is able to suggest many possibilities which enlarge our thoughts and free them from the tyranny of custom. The Value of Philosophy However, I think it is more of a question of thinking more. Is consciousness a permanent part of the universe, giving hope of indefinite growth in wisdom, or is it a transitory accident on a small planet on which life must ultimately become impossible?

Many philosophers, it is true, have held that philosophy could establish the truth of certain answers to such fundamental questions. Prior to studying philosophy, the world was simple, dogmatism came cheap, and frankly, the world was pretty bland.

The value of philosophy in entrepreneurship

Indianapolis, Indiana: Hackett The Hackett dialogue series are good primers on the topics they cover. Finishing a great book in philosophy most of the time means concluding with more questions than I started with. The aforementioned comic explores not only this theory but the opposing argument, in the form of a slug-like alien who is adamant about sticking to his old ways. Part of the reason why philosophy does not bear such a body of evidence is because when definite knowledge on a subject becomes possible, it splits off forming another discipline. I am using my brain without my mind, and here is the distinction between thinking and thinking well. Many philosophers, it is true, have held that philosophy could establish the truth of certain answers to such fundamental questions. It is the more necessary to consider this question, in view of the fact that many men, under the influence of science or of practical affairs, are inclined to doubt whether philosophy is anything better than innocent but useless trifling, hair-splitting distinctions, and controversies on matters concerning which knowledge is impossible. Therefore, you need to think more in order to live more.

Getting past the boxed mac-and-cheese simple answers to a feast of nuanced philosophy is, simply, wonderful. Socrates would agree that we have to look at philosophy as a necessity, as another way to survive as a tiny imprint on the universe. A bit challenging for the beginner but worth the effort.

It makes many of the more mundane, daily challenges I face much easier to handle.

What is the value of philosophy according to socrates

The madman is the man who has lost everything except his reason. Philosophy, though unable to tell us with certainty what is the true answer to the doubts which it raises, is able to suggest many possibilities which enlarge our thoughts and free them from the tyranny of custom. This enlargement of Self is not obtained when, taking the Self as it is, we try to show that the world is so similar to this Self that knowledge of it is possible without any admission of what seems alien. The impartiality which, in contemplation, is the unalloyed desire for truth, is the very same quality of mind which, in action, is justice, and in emotion is that universal love which can be given to all, and not only to those who are judged useful or admirable. Russell explicitly addresses the "practical man" who only recognizes philosophy as a pursuit of "hair-splitting distinctions" and irrelevant trifling. In such a life there is something feverish and confined, in comparison with which the philosophic life is calm and free. To such a man the world tends to become definite, finite, obvious; common objects rouse no questions, and unfamiliar possibilities are contemptuously rejected. All too often philosophy is thought of as some daunting subject, inaccessible to the average man, and fit only for people with too much time on their hands or scholars.
Rated 5/10 based on 95 review
Download
Philosophy News